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· Android Lover
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1,178 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I got my Nexus two days ago and rooted it ASAP, and did flash my first ROM at 100% battery like I did on the Droid.

However, I have not really let the phone get below 50% and have been charging it a lot. I read though that I should let it go through several "power cycles", does this mean charge to full, then let the phone die and turn off then repeat?

As far as deleting battery stats, I have seen 2 methods that are opposites of the other. In one, you do several power cycles then wipe battery stats and you are good to go. The other one, you wipe stats first, then do the power cycles. Which one is correct?

Lastly, I know on the Droid I only worried about battery stats in reference to flashing ROMs in which I wiped data. Is there a need to be at 100% battery when flashing kernels? or just ROMs

Thanks!!
 

· Android Apprentice
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110 Posts
Drain it to dead, pull the battery, reseat, turn phone on. it will be at like <20%. Drain it again, rinse and repeat.

Do this till the phone stops booting.

Then keep the phone off and charge it to full (give it a good 4 hours).

ICS calibration is one of the contributing factors to battery drain, old methods are not reliable.

Also, turn off location services and set wifi on during sleep to never. this will fix the android OS issues.
 

· Android Lover
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1,178 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Can you elaborate why the tradional methods dont work? Doesnt the batterystats file just get wiped every time you flash a ROM?

I thought draining a Liithium ion battery to the bottom was very bad for it.
 

· I solve problems
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1,173 Posts
http://batteryuniver...based_batteries

This website is great for those who like to completely discharge
Just some cool facts. It is definitely counter productive to completely drain your battery on a regular basis. I know I charge whenever I can as you can easily triple the number of complete discharges from it by charging it more often.
 

· I solve problems
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1,173 Posts
So sounds like it is pretty bad to fully drain the battery...can anyone shed some light on to how to properly calibrate the battery then?
Just do it the normal way. Draining it once or twice isn't going to be a big deal. I'm just saying to do your best to not make a habit of it. That post was more for people who drain the phone every time they charge to keep it "calibrated". Try to flash your roms with full battery and plugged in etc.. And as said before, you can always buy a new battery down the road
 
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So worst-case it seems as though completely draining your battery will drop the capacity to 70% over around a years time (if you use around 1 cycle per day which seems to be the general trend). This means that by the end of the year you'll likely buy another battery. Lots of us already bought an extra extended battery and I even bought an extra regular battery because it came with the external charger I got. This means I'm basically set for almost 3 years of 100% discharge daily which is extremely unlikely anyways since I'll have a new phone in probably a year's time
 

· Android Apprentice
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110 Posts
I think I should be clear, I'm not recommending this is how you charge battery every time. But only the first time, I say this because when you reboot a battery that you've pulled you will notice that you have some time as much is 50 percent extra. We're not talking about the bottom 5 percent here , we're talking about an entire extra quarter of the battery. I c s is simply not reading the proper battery stats out of the box. This has about as much potentil of hurting your battery as overclocking does of hurting your processor - only if you do it abusively. The phone and batteries are designed to the phone won't even boot if the battery is under 5 true percent
 

· Registered
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1,988 Posts
I've always heard the same....jury still out on this method

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk
Well you're not likely to be able to trick it into booting with less than 3200-3000mv. Which 3000mv is about 500mv above where the damage threshold is.

As far as battery stats go that is an almost worthless exercise as the file is rebuilt every time you flash a ROM. If you're really into deleting this file just delete it upon every boot. Your % will not be very far off & you won't get better or worse battery life as the your phone will shut down upon reaching ~3200mv regardless of what the displayed % says.
 

· Fearless tester of the dev&#39;ers work
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59 Posts
Just a comment, see the Battery Calibration thread for the Nexus One on XDA if you need confirmation. Most quality batteries are calibrated correctly, meaning they charge to 100% and die at 0% or <1%. Fully charging with the phone ON and draining til empty/auto-shutdown a couple of times allows the batterys' chip to learn its full40 point(true 100%) and its' empty point. Then you can get the most out of the battery. In order to accomplish this, you need to be able to get the battery into "learn mode". We created an app for the N1 that allows us to calibrate it correctly. On the GN, you can force it into Learn Mode by inserting the charge cable into the charge port at the moment it goes into auto-shutdown mode(you gotta be ready and really, really quick). Once it gets above 80% charged, put it into Airplane mode so no apps/processes draw power which might artifically cause it to reach 100% too soon(measured by -mv draw). Once in airplane mode, leave it alone for a couple of hours(til 100% charged), then reboot. Hope this helps clarify the confusion.
 

· Android Apprentice
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110 Posts
Well you're not likely to be able to trick it into booting with less than 3200-3000mv. Which 3000mv is about 500mv above where the damage threshold is.
What this guy said.

I urge you guys to look at the number of posts regarding people who report inconsistent battery drain, and even battery gain while their batteries are un-calibrated. This is just a fast method to get your battery calibrated right the first time.

Understand, the phone *will not boot* if you're at the low threshold of the battery. The phone, however, has been known to think a battery is dead when it is in fact at 20 - 50%
 
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