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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
jbrock98 said:
Just curious if you never have auto brightness on then these settings mean nothing right? I just use my power widget to turn brightness up when I need it but mostly I have it defaulted to the dim setting

Sent from my DROIDX
correct, if you have no need for auto brightness, then this thread won't be useful to you
 

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Where are the default values for a given firmware called out? I am assuming these values can be set to better suit our device by default. All custom roms I've used had default values that stunk and I've never used auto brightness (until reading this thread that is).
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
These are probably somewhere in the classes.dex of the Settings.apk. We could change them so that they are incorporated by default, but it would be up to Rom developers to implement this change.
 

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"droidxchat said:
These are probably somewhere in the classes.dex of the Settings.apk. We could change them so that they are incorporated by default, but it would be up to Rom developers to implement this change.
That's what I'm saying. I'm trying to learn as much as possible about how the system works. If I ever build my own custom this will be included :p
 

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"SaurusX said:
I have to disagree about you saying that the screen will never get set to 50. When the filtered sensor reading is between 20 and 99 the screen will be set to 50. Of course, it's only transitioning between two different raw sensor readings when in that range, but you can make the changes in brightness progress more smoothly by having those extra intervals. That's why I feel it's useful to have my eight intervals.
Exactly why I have my settings that I have posted
 

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SaurusX said:
I have to disagree about you saying that the screen will never get set to 50. When the filtered sensor reading is between 20 and 99 the screen will be set to 50. Of course, it's only transitioning between two different raw sensor readings when in that range, but you can make the changes in brightness progress more smoothly by having those extra intervals. That's why I feel it's useful to have my eight intervals.
BMc08GT said:
Exactly why I have my settings that I have posted
OK two huge reasons you should reconsider. Let's consider a situation to use as an example: Say you're outside where its reading 3600. Then you move inside where its reading 100.

1) Even though your in an area where your phone is reading 100, since it's taking an average based on the past as well, it's going to be basing its value partly off of where you just were (outside) rather than basing the brightness entirely on where you are now. The deviation between our 4 descrete detected values is so great, that having the light sensor filter on will actually decrease the accurate correlation between environment and screen brightness.

2) Having the filter on can make you hit a point within a range as you said, but you need to realize it doesn't have the ability to last. Even if you set your window length to 60 seconds, your filtered brightness is going to quickly dive and then slowly plateau, finally hitting a flat 100 after 60 seconds has passed and that last 3600 reading is out of the picture.

And BMc08GT, I saw your settings... you have your Reset Threshold at 400lux. That right there means that your filter is only "good" for 2 values: 10 and 100 and only when they change between each other. If you go from 10 to any number beside 100, or from 100 to any number beside 10, your filter is going to instantly reset anyway. I'm only trying to help you when I tell you this, because its painful to see those settings in a thread dedicated to saving battery, having the filter on is a huge waste of cpu especially since you are only using it in 2 out of a possible 6 scenarios, and even then it only lasts for your window length of 30s, and even then it is causing you to have a reading that isn't entirely based on where you are. And anything that wastes cpu is wasting battery.
 

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"droidxchat said:
OK two huge reasons you should reconsider. Let's consider a situation to use as an example: Say you're outside where its reading 3600. Then you move inside where its reading 100.

1) Even though your in an area where your phone is reading 100, since it's taking an average based on the past as well, it's going to be basing its value partly off of where you just were (outside) rather than basing the brightness entirely on where you are now. The deviation between our 4 descrete detected values is so great, that having the light sensor filter on will actually decrease the accurate correlation between environment and screen brightness.

2) Having the filter on can make you hit a point within a range as you said, but you need to realize it doesn't have the ability to last. Even if you set your window length to 60 seconds, your filtered brightness is going to quickly dive and then slowly plateau, finally hitting a flat 100 after 60 seconds has passed and that last 3600 reading is out of the picture.

And BMc08GT, I saw your settings... you have your Reset Threshold at 400lux. That right there means that your filter is only "good" for 2 values: 10 and 100 and only when they change between each other. If you go from 10 to any number beside 100, or from 100 to any number beside 10, your filter is going to instantly reset anyway. I'm only trying to help you when I tell you this, because its painful to see those settings in a thread dedicated to saving battery, having the filter on is a huge waste of cpu especially since you are only using it in 2 out of a possible 6 scenarios, and even then it only lasts for your window length of 30s, and even then it is causing you to have a reading that isn't entirely based on where you are. And anything that wastes cpu is wasting battery.
I was referring to the statement of the eight levels. I see the reasoning behind the light sensor and have thus set it to off. Thanks for the tip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
BMc08GT said:
I was referring to the statement of the eight levels. I see the reasoning behind the light sensor and have thus set it to off. Thanks for the tip.
OK cool, but you know that having 8 levels is useless too right? You can have as many levels as you want but you will only ever use a maximum 4 of them.
 

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"droidxchat said:
OK cool, but you know that having 8 levels is useless too right? You can have as many levels as you want but you will only ever use a maximum 4 of them.
I tried 8 levels a while back and I can say from experience they don't work. They actually seemed to cause my phone not to adjust brightness correctly.
 

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Money Mike said:
I tried 8 levels a while back and I can say from experience they don't work. They actually seemed to cause my phone not to adjust brightness correctly.
I'm going to have to disagree with you. I have eight levels and they work just fine for me. Though I can see the logic of only having four... there are only four different reading of the light sensor. However, if you have the filter on, then it takes an average light sensor reading over the last 10 seconds (or whatever) and gets a filtered sensor score. I understand that the filtered score is only transitioning from one sensor reading to another, for example 100 to 3600, and will eventually settle at 3600. It's just a personal preference to include some ranges in between there with gradually increasing screen brightness. It looks "cooler" to me.
 

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SaurusX said:
I'm going to have to disagree with you. I have eight levels and they work just fine for me. Though I can see the logic of only having four... there are only four different reading of the light sensor. However, if you have the filter on, then it takes an average light sensor reading over the last 10 seconds (or whatever) and gets a filtered sensor score. I understand that the filtered score is only transitioning from one sensor reading to another, for example 100 to 3600, and will eventually settle at 3600. It's just a personal preference to include some ranges in between there with gradually increasing screen brightness. It looks "cooler" to me.
I just wanna point out one more time in case you didn't see what I said.

If you have light filter set to on:

-A reset threshold of anything other than "disabled" is going to make all of your extra levels (those not including 10, 100, 3600, or 8600) useless except for the ones between 10 and 100.
-Your extra levels are only going to be active for a maximum of your window length (10s on your settings). They don't have the ability to be persistent because of the huge deviation between the Droid X's discrete detected values.
-You're going to change brightness much more slowly, and I don't even mean because of the extra brightness level in between, I mean because the extra CPU usage will cause your phone to adjust slower.
-If you move to a different environment, you're going to be using a screen brightness based partially on where you were rather than entirely on where you are for a period of time equal to your window length (10s for you).
-You're going to drain more battery and use up processor allotment in real-time, meaning 100% of the time your screen is active.

If this is worth the "cool" look to you then you have nothing to worry about, just want to make sure you know the details.
 

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"droidxchat said:
I just wanna point out one more time in case you didn't see what I said.

If you have light filter set to on:

-A reset threshold of anything other than "disabled" is going to make all of your extra levels (those not including 10, 100, 3600, or 8600) useless except for the ones between 10 and 100.
-Your extra levels are only going to be active for a maximum of your window length (10s on your settings). They don't have the ability to be persistent because of the huge deviation between the Droid X's discrete detected values.
-You're going to change brightness much more slowly, and I don't even mean because of the extra brightness level in between, I mean because the extra CPU usage will cause your phone to adjust slower.
-If you move to a different environment, you're going to be using a screen brightness based partially on where you were rather than entirely on where you are for a period of time equal to your window length (10s for you).
-You're going to drain more battery and use up processor allotment in real-time, meaning 100% of the time your screen is active.

If this is worth the "cool" look to you then you have nothing to worry about, just want to make sure you know the details.
+1 to this. I had the reset threshold enabled and it took forever for my phone to change brightness. It was most annoying in my truck in the dock. Now that I've disabled this my screen changes almost instantly when going from shade to direct sunlight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I've added option 2 to the OP, inspired by gpaulu's settings, which I analyzed in the OP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Here's a cool trick I just found by accident...

If you press settings + vol up, it will set your brightness to max. I guess this is a quick way to get there if you are in a bright area and dont want to wait for your phone to auto adjust.
 
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droidxchat said:
Here's a cool trick I just found by accident...

If you press settings + vol up, it will set your brightness to max. I guess this is a quick way to get there if you are in a bright area and dont want to wait for your phone to auto adjust.
Nice! The auto adjust doesn't take that long, but the settings + volume up is extremely useful when needing to check something fast.
 
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