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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let me preface this post with the obligatory "I Google'd the $#@! out of this before posting" disclaimer, haha.

I use Google Voice and PBXes.org to make nearly all of my calls from my Galaxy Nexus. I did use SIPdroid to set this up initially, but I hated its interface so much that I eventually set up PBXes to connect with the native Android Dialer using its SIP function.

This works well for the most part, and it allows you to change settings such as the use of TCP or UDP, the port, server, etc. However, it does not let you select the audio codec to be used when making these calls. I believe it uses the G711x (or something like it) codec by default, which is fairly data-intensive compared to the GSM, PCM, and speex codecs.

The SIPdroid app lets you select which codec to use when making calls, but the Android native dialer does not. I build from source every week or so, and noticed a few weeks ago on Gerrit that this was merged: http://gerrit.sudoservers.com/#/c/2747/ . The code refers to different PCM codecs, including an 8-bit one that I think would be less bandwidth-hungry. To my untrained eyes it looks like this commit added these codecs to the native VOIP/SIP client.

Is there any way to make the native SIP dialer use one of these faster/lighter codecs? I want to avoid using SIPdroid, CSIPsimple, or any other non-native solution if possible, but I also want calls to be fairly reliable on my 3G connection. If anyone knows of a way to edit these files to force the use of a certain codec by the native dialer please let me know.

James
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the reply and advice, I'm actually running a Google Voice account through PBXes.org or I would try to roll my own server. Something that has actually helped the stock dialer to become more bearable is switching to UDP rather than TCP -- I guess UDP deals better with packet loss, so a semi-shoddy connection doesn't completely shut down a VOIP stream (whereas the same connection using TCP would get screwed over by any packet loss). Thanks again!
 
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