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Premium Member
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sudo apt-get is a powerful, powerful weapon tool.

Thanks for the info.

Kubuntu is still regularly updated with Ubuntu?
Kubuntu is Ubuntu. Ubuntu is an OS and KDE is a desktop. Neither is directly dependant on Kubuntu. They just stick them together and make sure they work + add a few things. Basically a kang.
 

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Premium Member
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Technically, you don't need all that though, so the kde package works just fine.
Him being new to KDE, he would want them though. No one wants a half ass first experience.
 

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n00blet
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142 Posts
Honestly if you hardly know linux I am willing to bet you dislike unity because everyone else does. You have really no clue on other DE's. Give unity a run and don't judge on other newb Linux users opinions. IE, like myself.

And part of the stablity of Ubuntu is that it DOES NOT use the latest and greatest, this includes the kernel. If you are new to Linux you are ill prepared to run the newest as you'd probably shit yourself once your mouse stopped working.

Just because it is newer does not make it better.

I am not trying to be an asshole(Am in an asshole mood) but if your newish to linux, honestly you are not ready for the issues the 'LATEST AND GREATEST' packages may present.
 

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Banned
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Honestly if you hardly know linux I am willing to bet you dislike unity because everyone else does. You have really no clue on other DE's. Give unity a run and don't judge on other newb Linux users opinions. IE, like myself.

And part of the stablity of Ubuntu is that it DOES NOT use the latest and greatest, this includes the kernel. If you are new to Linux you are ill prepared to run the newest as you'd probably shit yourself once your mouse stopped working.

Just because it is newer does not make it better.

I am not trying to be an asshole(Am in an asshole mood) but if your newish to linux, honestly you are not ready for the issues the 'LATEST AND GREATEST' packages may present.
Perfect example:
Just yesterday I was doing my regular apt-get update & upgrade routine when I noticed an update to sysvinit-utils broke sysvutils and wouldn't allow my system to boot graphically. Fixed it by grabbing an old natty package. The latest and greatest isn't always the best.
 

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Android Aficionado
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279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
I use Docky and hide the Unity launcher, but I'm not so much new to Linux as I am not very good with it... I've been hobby-using Ubuntu since the 9.04 days, I've just never really used it over Windows that much. Same thing basically lol, I still have no idea what to do if I can't boot graphically, I wouldn't know why, I would just say screw it and reinstall Ubuntu via CD.
 

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Supermandroid
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177 Posts
I use Docky and hide the Unity launcher, but I'm not so much new to Linux as I am not very good with it... I've been hobby-using Ubuntu since the 9.04 days, I've just never really used it over Windows that much. Same thing basically lol, I still have no idea what to do if I can't boot graphically, I wouldn't know why, I would just say screw it and reinstall Ubuntu via CD.
You sound exactly like me! Lol. I've been a hobby Linux user for some time and even installed Linux with a Windows theme on my parents desktop to keep them from getting viruses (they only ever used it for web browsing). I'm the tech head of the family, and I have been dabbling. I also would like to know more about the freedom and control that Linux provides. I recently bought a used Macbook to round out my "awareness and exposure." Arch intrigued me from what you guys had been saying, would that be too technical for a newbie?
 

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Average Android
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377 Posts
You sound exactly like me! Lol. I've been a hobby Linux user for some time and even installed Linux with a Windows theme on my parents desktop to keep them from getting viruses (they only ever used it for web browsing). I'm the tech head of the family, and I have been dabbling. I also would like to know more about the freedom and control that Linux provides. I recently bought a used Macbook to round out my "awareness and exposure." Arch intrigued me from what you guys had been saying, would that be too technical for a newbie?
In my opinion, Arch is great if you want to learn how things work. Sit with the installation guide or even watch an install via you tube. You will learn more about linux than you ever would just installing and using a normal distribution and when it boots up the first time with a graphical interface you feel a sense of accomplishment, like if you had fixed something by yourself on your car or at home.

Then what you learn from the arch install/setup can be used with virtually any distro/desktop.
 

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Android Aficionado
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279 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
Sounds like a plan.... is Arch like...you build from the ground up whatever you want, or does it have a certain look?

I'd love to build a Linux distro where it looks like OSX but without something like Unity.
 

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Banned
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Sounds like a plan.... is Arch like...you build from the ground up whatever you want, or does it have a certain look?

I'd love to build a Linux distro where it looks like OSX but without something like Unity.
Arch is built from the ground up. It starts you off with basically nothing but a shell and a package manager, and then you add all the packages to your liking. You get to install X.org yourself and choose a desktop environment, window manager, etc. It's pretty neat.

As for a mac osx look --> http://gnome-look.org/content/show.php?content=141212
There's plenty more os x themes, that's just one of them.
 

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Android Aficionado
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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
And Pear Linux lol but that's.....eh.

I meant more OSX as in the dock is the launcher, as opposed to something like Unity or the bar at the top for most distros like Mint and Fedora...and I guess the theme too lol, I'll check those out, thanks.
 

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Premium Member
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4,348 Posts
Arch is built from the ground up. It starts you off with basically nothing but a shell and a package manager, and then you add all the packages to your liking. You get to install X.org yourself and choose a desktop environment, window manager, etc. It's pretty neat.
Eh, plenty of distros give you that option. Debian with a network install does that. Pretty much anything less noobish than Ubuntu has the option. The difference between Arch and others is Arch is bleeding edge.
 

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Average Android
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377 Posts
Eh, plenty of distros give you that option. Debian with a network install does that. Pretty much anything less noobish than Ubuntu has the option. The difference between Arch and others is Arch is bleeding edge.
Correct me if I am wrong but the netinstall of Debian still defaults you to Gnome 2 as your desktop and it doesn't walk you through things like setting up the servers you want to check for updates and setting up users and their privileges and setting up the login screen and setting up the DE of your choice, etc.
 

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Premium Member
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Correct me if I am wrong but the netinstall of Debian still defaults you to Gnome 2 as your desktop and it doesn't walk you through things like setting up the servers you want to check for updates and setting up users and their privileges and setting up the login screen and setting up the DE of your choice, etc.
Net install, unless you select extra crap (which it gives you the option), installs minimal debian + kernel + apt. That's it. You boot directly to a command line. I use net install quite a bit to mirror server setups locally in a VM.
 

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Banned
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Net install, unless you select extra crap (which it gives you the option), installs minimal debian + kernel + apt. That's it. You boot directly to a command line. I use net install quite a bit to mirror server setups locally in a VM.
I think Ubuntu Server gives you that too.
 

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Premium Member
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I think Ubuntu Server gives you that too.
Yeah, it does, but there's no reason to use Ubuntu on a server. Servers are meant to be stable and Ubuntu is not. Ubuntu is just a fork of Debian. Thus, just use Debian, heh. Differences between them as servers are not much when there's no desktop tools involved.
 

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Registered
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105 Posts
Mind if I join in? I started using Linux a little over a year ago. I bought a custom built PC, it had Windows 7 on it. I have to admit, Windows 7 was better than I anticipated, having had XP and it's accompanying nightmares on my old PC. Then a friend of mine suggested I setup a dual-boot for Linux because of it's inherent qualities, especially from a security point. I'm pretty familiar with computers, but I can't sling code and do all that power-stuff like some of you fellas here
. I chose openSUSE, ran that for about a week and wasn't really understanding everything- it's hard for me to admit to myself when I need to start off on the easy setting. So I went with Mint, worked out better, and still rockin' it- right now, I'm on Mint 11 with GNOME. I heard there were certain issues with 12 (can't remember what) and I haven't bothered with 13 because I want to try something different. I'm with Jimmyco, I'm ready to slide up a notch. I'd like to understand the command line better, right now I just find the commands I need to do certain things and copy/paste, not understanding everything I'm doing. All in all, though, Linux has treated me well, and the only time I use my Win7 partition is when I have to do something that absolutely requires windows, like watching Netflix. These are the main reasons why I use Linux:

-- Lightweight and resource friendly, better performance.
-- Security! It's awesome when you don't have to load anti-virus, anti-malware, anti-spyware, anti-(insert something malicious)
-- Free! Before Linux, I had no idea there was a wealth of free quality software out there, let alone that there's a strong community among users for support.

So I think I'm gonna go with a suggestion from a page back and read some manuals, then try building something from scratch. I've heard in the past that Arch is the preferred way to go if you want to do the scratch thing, and that seemed to be reiterated here, although yarly, you say most non-noob distros can do that... would you suggest Arch in this case or something else? Thanks, and thanks for starting this topic OP.
 

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Premium Member
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So I think I'm gonna go with a suggestion from a page back and read some manuals, then try building something from scratch. I've heard in the past that Arch is the preferred way to go if you want to do the scratch thing, and that seemed to be reiterated here, although yarly, you say most non-noob distros can do that... would you suggest Arch in this case or something else? Thanks, and thanks for starting this topic OP.
If you want to make Linux configuration a hobby and not so much for just work, then arch is totally fine for you. Otherwise, I would go with something else. Try using it in a virtual machine at first if you wish to try it. That way if you find it too much, you don't have to redo your whole system.

I'm sure I'll get the wraith of arch users on me for saying, but I have a job and in my job I already use Linux all day, so I expect it to work without wondering why my sound card isn't working or display drivers. I use linux to get things done other than just using linux :)
 

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The Incredible Kangaroo
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703 Posts
If you want to make Linux configuration a hobby and not so much for just work, then arch is totally fine for you. Otherwise, I would go with something else. Try using it in a virtual machine at first if you wish to try it. That way if you find it too much, you don't have to redo your whole system.

I'm sure I'll get the wraith of arch users on me for saying, but I have a job and in my job I already use Linux all day, so I expect it to work without wondering why my sound card isn't working or display drivers. I use linux to get things done other than just using linux :)
No "wraith" from this Arch user.
I agree with you completely. Arch will teach you a lot, but it's also bleeding edge. And the term uses "bleeding" for a reason, because you just might
"cut" yourself (sorry, I'm drinking coffee and tend to make stupid jokes while I wake up and the caffeine kicks in). If you need your computer to work, and can't deal with the downtime of it not working due to upgrading to a just-released package that might have compatibility issues, go with some other distro. If you're not careful (and even if you are), Arch can break stuff, especially if you upgrade your packages globally.

Just a hobby: Arch is perfect, will teach you a lot, etc. If you need 100% up time, not so much. Then again, those who need 110% uptime, tend to stick with a very old distro that is proven to work, and they just apply security patches. Much less exciting.
 
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